When Theology "Justifies" Foolishness

When the Europeans were first arriving in the North America they were rejoicing over the slaughter of the natives. They’d share the gospel and, without near immediate repentance, they would slaughter and somehow feel guiltless as they moved on.

Today, missionaries are trying to learn how leave as little collateral damage as possible. But we still don’t have it figured out. Partly because our theology justifies our actions to ourselves now as it did then. Just for different things.

In what things do I use my theology to justify my actions—and will I one day believe I was way off base?

Comfort's Relationship with the Supernatural

Our level of comfort seems to affect our ability to see the supernatural. The more comfortable we are, the less we ask for the supernatural, or expect it, because we don’t feel we need it.

Certainly the finances to put food on our own table day in and day out has us seldom praying for food. And as such, the Lord doesn’t need to provide it supernaturally. But when you’re hungry, and your kids are hungry, you pray and pray, and your expectation that the Lord will provide is heightened because He has to, and He does.

The more spiritually oppressive the place is, the more you beg for mercy from the Lord just walking down the street. In the beautiful resort mountain town, you might be thankful (and you should be), but you probably aren’t begging the Lord to help you make it the next three hundred yards. When you’re sick, and the street is covered in filth, and the people are miserably lost and hopeless around you, then even making it to the next block requires incredible dependence on the Spirit, and the Lord provides.

God is not done acting in supernatural ways, be that in healing or other more controversial things. He is at work right now, all over the world. Even in your life (if you’re a believer you can be sure of this), but you might be less likely to expect it, or even to notice it, if you live in an incredibly comfortable place.

Living comfortably is not a bad thing, but be careful writing off the supernatural as a thing of the past just because you’re in a place of never needing it.

Good Christians Don't Play Video Games

A few years ago, when we were home on a furlough, a couple had us over to talk about our missionary life. After talking for a bit the father mentioned to me that his son liked to play video games, he said this with some disappointment in his voice. I didn’t notice at first and I expressed excitement. I also like video games. I talked with his son about the games I played when I was a kid and we laughed about a few he still knows.

But apparently I did that wrong. The father wanted me to condemn it. Maybe I should have been “hyper spiritual.” But I’m not. And I don’t think pharisaical behavior is something we should ever have patience for. Maybe it’s something people expect from missionaries.

Jesus saves us, not our stereotypical “good Christian” behavior. If behavior saved, Mormons would be a lot less hopeless.

Whatever the case, the meeting was over.

Sorry I disappointed you.